May 152014
 

Edward Curtis’ image of the Paris Blanket

Morgan Green, Goomsm Xsgyiik (Winter Eagle Necklace), 2011 Photo: Bill Reid Gallery

Vancouver’s Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art is displaying work by Tsimshian artist Morgan Green until September 14, 2014.

The solo exhibition, Ts’msyen Transforming, introduces art created within her role as a Ts’msyen artist, communicated respectfully traditional oral histories and family legends. As well as the classical techniques of her people, green uses European goldsmithing, bronze casting and fashion design methods and practices.

http://www.billreidgallery.ca

 

Dec 042013
 

Corey Moraes, Storm Chaser Boots

Artist Corey Moraes, of Tsimshian Fine Arts, has designed a new product. In addition to his popular Spirit rain boots, he has created the new Storm Chaser boot. For more about his Northwest coast boot designs and to order a pair, see http://coreymoraes.com/

 

Nov 052012
 
photo

Norman Tait, distinguished Nisga’a Lifetime Award recipient
Photo: Spirit Wrestler gallery

The British Columbia Achievement Foundation has announced the winners of its 2012 BC Creative Achievement Award recipients for First Nations Art.

Nisga’a artist Norman Tait was named the recipient of the 2012 Creative Lifetime Achievement Award for First Nations’ Art for his profound impact in his community and First Nations culture.

Wayne Alfred, Kwakwaka’wakw from Alert Bay, Morgan Green, Tsimshian from Vancouver, Philip Janze, Gitxsan from Hazelton, Skeena Reece Tsimshian/Gitxsan/Cree from Uclulet, and David Wilson, Okanagan from Vernon received $5000 and the seal of the BC Creative Achievement Award for First Nations art. Premier Christie Clark will present the awards at a ceremony on November 19 2012. Polygon Homes limited is the award sponsor.

Apr 012012
 
Mayor Lew Williams and Cara Wallace, KIC Tribal Education Director. Photo courtesy KIC

Mayor Lew Williams and Cara Wallace, KIC Tribal Education Director. Photo courtesy KIC

The city of Ketchikan Alaska has designated April 1 to 7 2012 as Honoring Our Speakers Week, and are holding events to give special tribute to the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian fluent speakers in the tribal community there. A film The Linguists will be screened on April 3, about linguists David Harrison and Gregory Anderson who are “scientists racing to document languages on the verge of distinction”. http://www.thelinguists.com

Apr 012012
 
Harlan Smith’s photo of the Tsimshian house post sculpture Whole Being,  from the Museum of Civilization exhibition

Harlan Smith’s photo of the Tsimshian house post sculpture Whole Being, from the Museum of Civilization exhibition

The exhibition From Time Immemorial: Tsimshian Prehistory which has been in the Great Hall of the Canadian Museum of Civilization in Hull since May 1994 will end on December 31 2012. Millions of visitors to the Museum saw the re-construction of excavations of ancient Tsimshian sites carried out in the area of Prince Rupert.

The Museum will keep a virtual exhibition of the same name on its website: http://www.civilization.ca/cmc/exhibitions/aborig/tsimsian/intro00e.shtml

Mar 042012
 
Roy Vickers, II Timothy 2:11, 1976  Photo: Nicola-Frank Vachon, Perspectives

Roy Vickers, II Timothy 2:11, 1976 Photo: Nicola-Frank Vachon, Perspectives

The National Museum of Civilization in Ottawa currently has an exhibition God(s): A User’s Guide, running until September 3 2012. The work by Tsimshian artist Roy Vickers (illustrated above) is displayed in the context of world religions and spirituality, alongside Islamic calligraphy, and a Jewish Torah Ark constructed in a folk-art style. See http://civilization.ca


Jan 092012
 
Boxley The Eagle and the Chief at NMAI  Photo: Katherine Fogden

Boxley The Eagle and the Chief at NMAI Photo: Katherine Fogden

The Museum of the American Indian in Washington DC has commissioned Tsimshian carver David Boxley and his son David Boxley Jr. to create a 22.5 ft totem pole for the museum’s Potomac Atrium. The Boxleys are currently completing and painting the pole in the museum atrium. The pole depicts the story of a young man who rescued an eagle entangled in a fishing net. The young man eventually became a chief. During a famine in the young man’s village, the grateful eagle brought food to his starving people. The young chief holding a fish stands at the base of the pole, the eagle stands above him.

Led by David Boxley the dance troup Git-Hoan, People of the Salmon, will perform on January 13 and 14 as part of the celebrations around the pole’s installation. David Boxley Sr. tells more about the pole at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lj3SuE9hr0

Also at the Museum of the American Indian until May 9 2012 is the exhibition Behind the Scenes: The Real Story of the Quileute Wolves, which explores the contemporary culture and heritage of the Quileute people of Washington state as a counterpoint to the supernatural storyline of the popular Twilight series. This well-attended exhibition originated at the Seattle Art Museum; see The Beat September 2010. To celebrate the opening, Quileute elder Chris Morganroth will tell traditional stories of his tribe. Some background to the political situation among the Quileute, and to the fictional Twilight series is at

http://thecaucus.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/09/15/real-world-quileutes-lobby-for-their-land/

Jul 092011
 
Shawn Edenshaw in  Mamook Chantie – Traditional Singing.  Photo: R. Badger

Shawn Edenshaw in Mamook Chantie – Traditional Singing. Photo: R. Badger

In connection with the exhibition Bill Reid and the Traditional Canoe, at the Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art, until January 8 2012, a program of Salish, Kwakwaw’akw, Tsimshian and Haida performers will present Mamook Chantie, canoe travel songs, welcome songs and more, and explain their meanings, on Wednesday July 20 at 7 pm.

http://www.billreidgallery.ca/Programs/PublicPrograms.php

Mar 162011
 

Port of Prince Rupert                         Opinion250 file photo

Port of Prince Rupert Opinion250 file photo

Discussions began in February in Prince Rupert BC about a Tsimshian Cultural Pavilion to be built on the waterfront as a welcome centre for tourists and cruise passengers. A 2007 Prince Rupert Tourism study found that cultural experiences are a top priority for visitors to the city. Consultant Te Taru White from New Zealand suggested that elements such as truthful exhibits, varied content and the presence of weavers, carvers and dance groups would be part of a successful balance between culture and commerce.

Nov 282010
 

Victor Reece, a noted and much-respected Tsimshian artist and storyteller, died on October 21 2010. Reece was born in 1946 near Prince Rupert and spent his childhood in Hartley Bay, his father’s village. He was a member of the Wolf Clan through his maternal Grandmother, Edith McDougal, matriarchal Chief of the Wolf Clan and his hereditary name is Whe’X Hue, meaning Big Sky. He studied at the ‘Ksan School of Art in Hazelton British Columbia and assisted in the design and construction of a traditional Tsimshian longhouse for the Canadian Museum of Civilization’s Great Hall.

Reece was part of the Big Sky Multimedia Storytelling Society, and performed often in the Talking Stick Festival. His Bear Mother Project resulted in three welcome poles at the entrance to the Community Hall on Pender Island.

Beaver Mother poles by Victor Reece and his team  Photo by Jeff Bateman

Beaver Mother poles by Victor Reece and his team Photo by Jeff Bateman

A video of Reece carving a mask is at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VlXwcV4Bfx8