May 092012
 
Marianne Nicolson, Foolmakers in the Setting Sun, 2012  Photo: Ann Cameron

Marianne Nicolson, Foolmakers in the Setting Sun, 2012 Photo: Ann Cameron

Marianne Nicolson’s work in the Surrey Art Gallery exhibition Vision Machine can be seen until June 10 2012. (See The Beat April 2012) The photograph taken of the installation in the darkened gallery at the SAG, catches the shadow of the Ghost and the Foolmakers overlaid on the projected image of the Alberta oilsands at dusk. Nicolson states: “The reference to dusk is a metaphor for the sustainability of the planet, given global warning and dwindling natural resources.”

http://www.surrey.ca/culture-recreation/1537.aspx

Nicolson is giving a talk at the Museum of Anthropology on Sunday, May 6 2012 at 1 pm, as part of the lecture series on Doug Cranmer’s influence on younger artists.

Apr 012012
 
That Which Makes Us Haida.  Exhibition at Bill Reid Gallery.  Photo: Ann Cameron

That Which Makes Us Haida. Exhibition at Bill Reid Gallery. Photo: Ann Cameron

The Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art in Vancouver has opened an exhibition of large, expressive photographs by Farah Nosh of the elders of the Haida nation who have retained fluency in the Haida language. Fewer than 40 speakers remain. A sound component of interviews with the elders portrayed brings further immediacy to the viewing experience.

Like many indigenous languages, the number of native speakers of minority languages is diminishing, but a program is underway in the Haida Gwaii to teach the younger generation their heritage culture and language. A Haida Immersion program will be held in Skidegate on April 27 and 28 2012, with an emphasis on teaching materials.

Haida language classes will be held at the Bill Reid Gallery on Sunday afternoons from 2 to 5 pm. For further programming announcements, see the website at http://www.billreidgallery.ca/

Apr 062011
 

Peter Morin, curator of Revisiting the Silence.  Photo: Anne Seymour

Peter Morin, curator of Revisiting the Silence. Photo: Anne Seymour

The March opening of the exhibition of photographs by Adelaide de Menil at the Bill Reid Gallery, Revisiting the Silence, was well-reviewed and well-attended. (See The Beat March 2011). The show continues until June 5 2011.

Curator Peter Morin gave a thoughtful talk at the launch which eloquently expressed his experiences as he selected the photographs of the coastal villages and forests of the indigenous inhabitants.

http://www.billreidgallery.ca

Apr 062011
 

Photo: David Campion

Photo: David Campion

Man Turned to Stone: T’xwelatse is an exhibition at The Reach Gallery and Museum in Abbotsford BC, April 14 to May 29 2011.

T’xwelatse is an ancient stone ancestor of the Chilliwack people. The exhibition includes a large photographic installation by photographer David Campoin depicting the human and geographic context of Stone T’xwelatse.

The opening reception on April 14 includes the premier performance of The T’xwelatse Story by the Semoya Dance Group. The Dance Group will perform The Story again on Saturday April 16 at 1 pm.

A panel discussion on the story of T’xwelatse will follow on Saturday.

More information at http://www.thereach.ca

Nov 302010
 

The Museum of Anthropology in Vancouver has two exhibitions of special interest in November: Signed without Signature: Works by Charles and Isabella Edenshaw, November 25 2010 to October 2 2011, and Man Ray, African Art and the Modernist Lens, through to January 23 2010. The latter concentrates on photographs of African objects by American artist Man Ray (1890-1976). Of particular interest to those who have a passion for any art, it provokes the viewer to think about the representation, reception, and perception of art as mediated by the camera lens, and as influenced by the context in which they will be presented. Contemporary movies are projected in the gallery. Related events are listed at http://www.moa.ubc.ca/events/.

Among them is When the Real Meets the Imagined: Northwest Coast Art and the Surrealists, on November 23 at 7 pm at MOA, by Marie Mauze of the Laboratoire d’Anthropologie Sociale in Paris. This talk is an opportunity to learn about the interest of the French surrealists in the art of the First Nations of our Pacific coast from the early 1920’s on.

Thunderbird – Hiilang nga xidid by Charles Edenshaw, ca 1890  Collection: MOA  Digital Scan: Bill McLennan

Thunderbird – Hiilang nga xidid by Charles Edenshaw, ca 1890 Collection: MOA Digital Scan: Bill McLennan

The MOA exhibition of works by Charles and Isabella Edenshaw includes work never before displayed in public. Many are new to Vancouver and others rarely seen. An opening reception, with everyone welcome, is at 7 pm on November 25 2010.

A talk and tour by Curator Bill McLennan on Tuesday November 30 at 7 pm will explain why certain works have been attributed to the Edenshaws (or not), and how their influence lives on.

The exhibition will be in the Museum’s Gallery 3, newly renamed the O’Brian Gallery in honour of the Michael O’Brian Family Foundation’s $1 million gift to the museum.