Jun 122014
 
 Bill Reid’s Raven during an AV experience  UBC Museum of Anthropology, June 2014  Photo: Ann Cameron

Bill Reid’s Raven during an AV experience UBC Museum of Anthropology, June 2014 Photo: Ann Cameron

Claiming Space: Voices of Urban Aboriginal Youth opened with a lively celebration on June 1, 2014 at the Museum of Anthropology in Vancouver. Twenty young artists use contemporary urban as well as traditional ways of expressing their cultural vision.

 

Apr 062013
 

‘Yagis, swallowing an oil tanker

Vancouver’s Museum of Anthropology’s display One Mind, One Heart in its Multiversity Galleries, created by artist Ian Reid Nusi and curator Pam Brown as a response to the Northern gateway pipeline proposal. Nusi’s mask shows the sea monster ‘Yagis eating an oil tanker. http://moa.ubc.ca/

Jun 072012
 
Nuxalk masks at Museum of Anthropology

Nuxalk masks at Museum of Anthropology

The Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia has opened a small exhibition called Together Again: Nuxalk Faces of the Sky. The mask and the corona seen here hanging on the wall in a case were given to the Seattle Art Museum in 1976.

A 1920 photograph showed that another Nuxalk sun mask that had been in the MOA collection since 1963 (lower right in case) was the original mask in the large corona.

The display is in the museum until September 10 2012. The Seattle Art Museum will display the cases from January 2013. The story is on the website http://www.nuxalk.net/html/living_culture.htm

 

Mar 042012
 
Doug Cranmer Untitled 9 (Canoe)  Photo: Royal British Columbia Museum

Doug Cranmer Untitled 9 (Canoe) Photo: Royal British Columbia Museum

Research on a Kwakwaka’wakw artist at the UBC Museum of Anthropology has resulted in both a major exhibition and a substantial book of the same name: Kesu : The Art and Life of Doug Cranmer. The exhibition opens on March 16 2012, on view until September 3 2012. Kesu is the Kwakwala name of the late Mr. Cranmer, and means “wealth being carved”.

The exhibition is organized in modules reflecting different aspects of Cranmer’s character, “perspectives,” and the range of his work.

Cranmer’s façade paintings of the U’Mista Cultural Centre and the Community Centre in Alert Bay are surely the largest of his works; other projects are in Stanley Park, Ottawa’s Museum of Civilization, Osaka’s Museum of Ethnology, the Glenbow Museum, Deep Cove, the Royal British Columbia Museum, and many private collections.

The 142-page book is published by Douglas & McIntyre and the Museum of Anthropology. It includes many photographs of Cranmer, colour illustrations of his extensive oeuvre and a Foreword by Gloria Cranmer Webster, his sister and like him a leader in the Alert Bay community. Curator Jennifer Kramer will speak on Sunday, March 18 at 1 pm about Cranmer.

As a tribute to Cranmer, who was a gifted teacher and inspired a great many younger artists, MOA is offering a series of talks by noted artists who worked with him, beginning with Richard Sumner on Sunday April 15 at 1 pm, and including also Meghann O’Brien, Bruce Alfred and Wayne Alfred, and Marianne Nicolson.

Mar 042012
 
Dancers of Damelahamid  Photo: Ana Pedrero

Dancers of Damelahamid Photo: Ana Pedrero

A major celebration of coastal First Nations dance will take place at the Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. A school program is on March 8 and 9th at 10 am.

Signature Performances” are on Friday March 9 and Saturday March 10 2012 at 7:30, with $20-25 tickets available at http://www.ticketstonight.ca

The “Festival Stage” performances, free with admission, are on Saturday March 10 and Sunday March 11 from 1 to 4 pm. All performances are in the imposing Great Hall of the Museum.

For more information on the festival, see http://www.moa.ubc.ca

Feb 092012
 
Museum of Anthropology, Vancouver, Canada

Museum of Anthropology, Vancouver, Canada

 In mid-February, Vancouver’s Museum of Anthropology is bringing two large works from storage into the Great Hall: a 1951 memorial pole by Mungo Martin, and Joe David’s 1984 Welcome Figure. As well, Eric Robertson’s Shaking the Crown Bone of 2000 will be placed at the north entrance of the Multiversity Galleries.

On February 14 from 4-5 pm, Jennifer Kramer launches Kesu’: the Life and Art of Doug Cranmer, at the MOA shop at the University of British Columbia. A major exhibition of Doug Cranmer’s work opens in March at MOA. http://www.moa.ubc.ca

Jan 092012
 
Bill Reid Raven Bracelet 1955  Friedman Collection, Museum of Anthropology, UBC  Photo: Bill McLennan

Bill Reid Raven Bracelet 1955 Friedman Collection, Museum of Anthropology, UBC Photo: Bill McLennan

The Museum of Anthropology in Vancouver has received a gift from Dr. Sydney Friedman and his late wife Constance, of their collection of twelve artworks by Haida artist Bill Reid. The work illustrated above, an complex hinged gold bracelet in the form of a raven, with curving outlines of feathered wings, dates from 1955.

The newly acquired works will be displayed in MOA’s Bill Reid Rotunda in early spring.

Events in the new year at MOA include a retrospective exhibition of the work of Kwakwaka’wakw artist Doug Cranmer in March, with an accompanying book by Jennifer Kramer. A lecture series by artists influenced by Cranmer will be held in April and May.

The wonderful 2012 Coastal First Nations Dance Festival is March 8 to 11. See http://www.moa.ubc.ca

Nov 012011
 
Jude Norris Imperfect Doll 2007  at Museum of Anthropology  Photo: Ann Cameron

Jude Norris Imperfect Doll 2007 at Museum of Anthropology Photo: Ann Cameron

 The Green Dress is an exhibition at Vancouver’s Museum of Anthropology on the theme of objects and memory, and our perception of them in museum’s collections. Cree/Metis artist Jude Norris’s 2007 piece in the exhibition shows a doll watching a video loop on a tiny monitor. We see the artist’s hands creating the doll, and writing the words that adorn its aboriginal-style dress.

Norris states: “The affirmations written on her dress represent both personal and cultural healing, encompassing a process of positive remembering, de-programming, and re-programming.”

The Green Dress exhibition was created as a complement to MOA’s exhibition hiroshima, 48 photographs by Ishiuchi Miyako, of clothing and accessories left behind by victims of the 1945 atomic bomb at Hiroshima. For more about MOA, see http://www.moa.ubc.ca