Oct 142015
 

Tanis Maria S’eiltin, Territorial Trappings

The La Conner Museum of Northwest Art has undertaken a large project: Not Vanishing: Contemporary Expressions in Indigenous Art, 1977-2015 is an exhibition aiming to “examine the evolution of the Contemporary Native American Arts Movement and the works of artists living in the northwest, with significant emphasis on the Puget Sound and Plateau regions.”

The exhibition will fill the entire museum, and include works art by more than 40 artists. Joe David, Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun, and Susan A. Point are among them.

Tanis Maria S’eiltin writes about her work illustrated above:

Lynx pelts sustain treasured times in a frozen territory.
The snapping of metal jaws and blood are absent, present was the thrill of success.
Strong hands stitched furs into sellable forms.
Success was measured by one’s cunning abilities to supplement life.

The opening celebration of the show is on Saturday, October 10, 2015; curator Gail Tremblay will discuss the Native American Contemporary Art Movement at 1:00 pm.

La Conner, Washington, is about 140 km. or 90 miles south of Vancouver, and 67 miles north of Seattle. See http://monamuseum.org

Apr 062013
 
Painting

awrence Paul Yuxweluptun, Fucking Creeps They’re Environmental Terrorists, 2013 Photo: Ann Cameron

See Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun’s new exhibition Indian World until May 4 2013 at Macaulay & Co Fine Art Gallery at 293 E. 2nd Avenue in Vancouver. A number of paintings are abstract in style, what the artist calls “Ovoidism”.

In the large painting Indian World, My Home and Native Land, Yuxweluptun uses a powerful palette to depict a nearly ruined Canadian landscape, reminding us of the ongoing dialogue regarding the land rights of First Nations people in Canada. Looking closely at the surreal scene the viewer sees the artist has used the elements of Coast Salish art to express his intense connection to his vision.

See http://mfineart.ca/

 

Jun 072012
 
Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun I Have a Vision that Some Day all Indigenous People Will Have Freedom and Self Government, 1987  Photo: Dietrich Graf, Staat. Museen zu Berlin

Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun I Have a Vision that Some Day all Indigenous People Will Have Freedom and Self Government, 1987 Photo: Dietrich Graf, Staat. Museen zu Berlin

The State Ethnology Museum in Berlin Dahlem is exhibiting works by North American First Nations artists who work in styles relating to modern art and their own traditions. Northwest coast artists chosen from its collection include Robert Davidson, Susan Point, Tony Hunt, Nicolas Galanin and Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun.

A 192-page catalogue accompanies the show; it runs until October 28 2012. See

http://www.smb.museum/indianischemoderne/index.php?page_id=1

May 092012
 
Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun,  Burying Another Face of Racism on First Nations Soil,1997 (detail)  Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery  Gift of Michael Audain and Yoshiko Karasawa  Photo: Rachel Topham, VAG

Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun, Burying Another Face of Racism on First Nations Soil,1997 (detail) Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery Gift of Michael Audain and Yoshiko Karasawa Photo: Rachel Topham, VAG

The Vancouver Art Gallery has announced a number of new acquisitions. Among them is a 4.8 m canvas by Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun entitled Burying Another Face of Racism on First Nations Soil. The painting was recently exhibited at the gallery in Shore, Forest and Beyond: Art from the Audain Collection.

Yuxweluptun’s work is being exhibited in New York at the Center 548 at 548 West 22nd Street, May 4 to 7, 2012, as part of the New Art Dealers Alliance Art Fair. For more see http://www.blanketgallery.com