Sep 142013
 

A. Sterritt Happy Sky/Heaven Honour Indigenous Women Ourselves, 2013 Photo: David Brosha, Wolf Design: Valerie Margan

Next on the schedule for Vancouver’s Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art is Rez/Erect: Native Erotica, “a fresh, playful, provocative insight into sensuality and sexuality.” Artists include Shawn Hunt, Nicholas Galanin, Dionne Paul, Preston Singletary and Alida Kinnie Starr.

The curators tell us :“Artists draw their inspiration from diverse sources: the natural world, language, oral histories, creation stories, ancient songs of love and heartbreak, dance, ceremony, traditional foods, working with wood and natural fibres.” The exhibition runs from September 25 2013 through February 16 2014.

This is the last week for Haisla artist Lyle Wilson’s exhibition Paint! at the Bill Reid Gallery before it closes on September 15 2013. The final program, at 2 pm on Saturday September 14, is Lyle Wilson’s Lost Essay in the British Museum. Wilson will speak about the evolution of the art of the Pacific Northwest coast based on his study of the works from the important collection of the British Museum.

For more about the gallery, see http://www.billreidgallery.ca

 

May 072013
 

Lyle Wilson Photo: Anne Seymour

The Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art, currently showing Paint: The Painted Works of Lyle Wilson, has invited this respected Haisla artist to speak about his own understanding and interpretation of the style of painting known as “formline”.

The exhibition of the work of Lyle Wilson continues until September 15 2013. See http://www.billreidgallery.ca/

 

Mar 112013
 

Lyle Wilson, Orca Chief, 1993 Collection of the Artist

 

The retrospective exhibition of Lyle Wilson’s work that first was shown in Maple Ridge in 2012, Paint : The Painted Works of Lyle Wilson, will now, fortunately, be seen by a wider audience at the Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art in downtown Vancouver, opening on Wednesday March 27 2013.

Works by Wilson, a member of the Haisla nation, are in many museum collections, and this exhibition includes an impressive array of master works.

The 66-page catalogue of the exhibition is well illustrated in colour and gives lucid and generous information about Wilson’s work and Haisla culture.

Jan 082013
 

Lyle Wilson, The Soul of the Traditional Haisla, 2011 (detail). Photo: Jenn Walton

A 41” x 31” panel painting,The Soul of the Traditional Haisla, by Haisla artist Lyle Wilson was created in 2011. It depicts the traditional territory of the Haisla nation, and situates its place names in the Haisla language, surrounded by crests and creatures found in the Haisla territory.

Wilson writes: “I believe that the Northwest Coast art style has its roots in local environments. This painting draws on memories of people, places, and events that I experienced in different parts of Haisla traditional territory, and includes history, politics, language, and tradition in its map format.”

When the artist approached the Haisla Nation Council, it agreed to underwrite the creation Haisla nation of a large poster of the image to be displayed in their office building. As well a large banner will be produced for display in the community gymnasium which is used for both sporting and cultural events in Kitamaat Village, near the city of Kitimat.

The exhibition where the painting was first shown, Paint: The Painted Works of Lyle Wilson (see The Beat May 2012) is being prepared to travel to other art museum venues.

 

May 092012
 
Lyle Wilson, Octopus, 1993  Photo: Jenn Walton

Lyle Wilson, Octopus, 1993 Photo: Jenn Walton

Lyle Wilson is well-known for his art and his collaborative historical research and carving demonstrations at the Museum of Anthropology in Vancouver. A solo show of the work of the Haisla artist, Paint: The Painted Works of Lyle Wilson, opens on May 5 and will continue until July 28 2012. Maple Ridge Art Gallery is at 11944 Haney Place in Maple Ridge, a short distance east of Vancouver.

A richly illustrated 80-page book accompanies the exhibition. The artist’s comments on the works of art are lucid and informative, and provide unusually good insight into the artist’s development and his Haisla culture. In fact, 800 copies of the catalogue are being distributed in the Kitimat area, so that members of the Haisla nation can enjoy the works, and see how the Haisla language relates to their themes.

http://www.theactmapleridge.org