Dec 072011
 
The Honourable Steven L. Point OBC, Xwe li qwel tel  Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia, greets  Haida artist Primrose Adams and congratulates her on receiving the 2011 BC Creative Lifetime Achievement Award for First Nations’ Art  Photo: Ann Cameron

The Honourable Steven L. Point OBC, Xwe li qwel tel Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia, greets Haida artist Primrose Adams and congratulates her on receiving the 2011 BC Creative Lifetime Achievement Award for First Nations’ Art. Photo: Ann Cameron

2011 Creative Achievement awards recipients are: Sonny Assu, Stan Bevan, Vera Edmonds, and Shawn Hunt. Photographs of the Awards ceremony can be viewed at http://www.bcachievement.com/firstnationsart/event.php?year=2011

This website also provides more information about the award, eligibility and the nomination process for it.

Dec 072011
 
Hibulb Cultural Center, Tulalip. Photo: Ann Cameron

Hibulb Cultural Center, Tulalip. Photo: Ann Cameron

The Hibulb Cultural Center & Natural History Preserve is open in Tulalip, on the north coast of Washington State. It is a $10M teaching centre for education and understanding of the culture and natural heritage of the Snohomish, Snoqualmie and Skykomish peoples. Attractive displays present a lucid and compelling discussion of the nations’ historic and economic issues. Artifacts and photographs draw us into the world of the First Peoples who have lived in the area for thousands of years.

The building itself, designed by StastnyBrun Architects, in consultation with tribal elders, is worth a visit. The centre is on a 42-acre site; work is underway to restore natural ecosystems around the centre.

For more information see http://hibulbculturalcenter.org/

Hall of Canoes, Hibulb Center. Photo: Ann Cameron

Hall of Canoes, Hibulb Center. Photo: Ann Cameron

 

Dec 072011
 
Artist Jim Hart with his sculpture The Three Watchmen. Photo from The Ottawa Citizen

Artist Jim Hart with his sculpture The Three Watchmen. Photo from The Ottawa Citizen

 

In 2003 Haida artist Jim Hart created a 16’ high bronze sculpture The Three Watchmen, which was placed by developer Michael Audain within a landscaped entrance area in a residential complex near Quilchena Park in Vancouver. The work has become a graceful and much-admired landmark in the neighbourhood.

This year a new bronze casting, second in a possible edition of three, has been made, and donated by Mr. Audain and his wife Yoshika Karasawa to the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa. It was installed on November 10 2011 outside the entrance of the National Gallery.To view a National Gallery of Canada video of the difficult installation of the sculpture on a traffic island on Sussex Drive outside the National gallery see

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Um3qZ__YMgY

Dec 072011
 

Discovering Totem Poles is a new book by distinguished scholar Aldona Jonaitis focusing on the histories of specific poles a visitor encounters in Seattle, Victoria, Vancouver, Alert Bay and other sites in British Columbia, Alaska and Washington State. It debunks common misconceptions about totem poles and explores the stories behind the making and displaying of 90 different poles. A short but very fine video clip on YouTube tells more about the book and subject: http://www.youtube.com/user/UWashingtonPress#p/a/u/1/iAaAnYctJcg

Dec 072011
 
Photo: Philip Hersee Photography

Photo: Philip Hersee Photography

 

A launch of a new book Bill Reid and the Haida Canoe will be held at the Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art at 639 Hornby in Vancouver on Thursday December 8 2011 at 5 pm. Admission is free.

Bill Reid and the Haida Canoe tells the story of the pivotal role of the
canoe in Northwest Coast art, cultures and communities from pre-contact to present day Tribal Journeys.

Principal author and editor Dr. Martine Reid is Director of Content and Research at the Bill Reid Gallery.

The related exhibition of photography continues at the Bill Reid Gallery until January 8, 2012, and will then tour to the Canadian Canoe Museum in Peterborough, Ontario.

For more information see http://www.billreidgallery.ca

Dec 072011
 
Squamish Lil'wat Cultural Centre. Photo: http://www.whistlertastingtours.com/whistler-cultural-centre

Squamish Lil'wat Cultural Centre. Photo: http://www.whistlertastingtours.com/whistler-cultural-centre

The Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre in Whistler BC continues its Lil’wat Weaving Wisdom exhibition.

The Centre has recently been given a second Chief Joe Mathias pole by a private collector. The newly acquired pole is about six feet high and depicts a thunderbird, bear and man. It is about 54 years old. For more information about the Squamish Lil’wat Centre, see http://www.slcc.ca

Dec 072011
 
The Craft and Culture of the Squamish Canoe. Photo: http://www.vancouvermaritimemuseum.com

The Craft and Culture of the Squamish Canoe. Photo: http://www.vancouvermaritimemuseum.com

 The Squamish Nation has partnered with the Vancouver Maritime Museum at 1905 Ogden Avenue, near Kitsilano Beach, in Vancouver; the exhibition Chatwilh : The Craft and Culture of the Squamish Canoe will run until May 21 2012.

http://www.vancouvermaritimemuseum.com

Dec 072011
 
Repoussé Beaver Pin with Engraved Stand. Edward Joe. Photo: http://www.alcheringa-gallery.com

Repoussé Beaver Pin with Engraved Stand. Edward Joe. Photo: http://www.alcheringa-gallery.com

In downtown Victoria, the Alcheringa Gallery’s new exhibition Chasing Form: New Directions in Repousséis the first show to focus particularly on the metal-working techniques of repoussé and chasing. Exhibiting artists, including Rande Cook, Edward Joe and Debbie Hamdzidi Hunt, attended a recent workshop by European-trained metalsmith Valentin Yotkov. Mr. Yotkov’s studio in New York specializes in the teaching of deep repoussé.

http://www.alcheringa-gallery.com

Dec 072011
 
Bradley Hunt, Makeshift Shelter. Lattimer Gallery

Bradley Hunt, Makeshift Shelter. Lattimer Gallery

For the past five years, selected northwest coast First Nations artists have donated their time, materials and creative efforts to the Lattimer Gallerys Annual Charity Bentwood Box Silent Auction.

In the process of raising donations for charity, these artists are
given the opportunity to create outstanding pieces by thinking
outside the box. All of the boxes have first been steam-bent and donated by Métis/Cree artist James Michels.
This year, the Lattimer Gallery and its participating artists raised $21,250 for Urban Native Youth Association, a Vancouver organization which has been providing 21 prevention-focused programs and services to First Nations youth since 1988 to help meet their immediate and longer-term needs. UNYAs work includes advocacy, community development, and providing youth with opportunities to provide input into their programs and services.
At the auction, notable high bids were
Robert Davidsons box at $5,000, Shawn Hunts box at $2,700, and Clint Works box at $2,500. Other interesting boxes sold were by Aaron Nelson-Moody, Gwaii Edenshaw, Barry Wilson, Sharifah Marsden and Phil Gray among others. More information at http://www.lattimergallery.com

Dec 072011
 
Joe David/Preston Singletary Shrine Figures.  Photo: Ann Cameron

Joe David/Preston Singletary Shrine Figures. Photo: Ann Cameron

Ka Ka Win Chealth: Joe David & Preston Singletary is an exhibition at the Spirit Wrestler Gallery in Vancouver until December 10 2011. The title of the exhibition is the traditional Nuu-chah-nulth family name given to Joe David meaning Orca Transforming or Wolf Transforming into Killer Whale.

Joe David has worked with Tlingit artist Preston Singletary at the Pilchuk Glass School near Seattle since 2000. The group of Shrine Figures illustrated above refers to the Yuquot Whalers’ Shrine, a ritual structure with figures traditionally used in the spiritual preparations for whale hunts.

The Gallery has published a striking and well-illustrated catalogue of the exhibition. For more information see http://www.spiritwrestler.com

Dec 072011
 
Fido fleece. A painting from the 1840s or '50s shows a Salish woolly dog. news.sciencemag.org

Fido fleece. A painting from the 1840s or '50s shows a Salish woolly dog. news.sciencemag.org

A recent article in the journal Antiquity, reported online in Past Horizons, adventures in archaeology, recounts the results of scientific studies at the University of York in England on the historic textiles of the Coast Salish First Nations. The protein composition of 25 samples of yarn was examined to determine their animal source. Samples were taken from eleven textiles in Smithsonian Museums’ collections. The results mostly confirm the Coast Salish oral tradition about the use in weaving of the hair of the wool dog. The textiles examined showed that wool dog hair mixed with goat wool was used in everyday textiles, with goat hair alone used in ceremonial textiles. None of the examined blankets was made solely of dog hair.

Research head Dr. Caroline Solazzo stated that the Salish peoples’ practice of “raising dogs for fibre production was a unique cultural adaptation.” For centuries the white wool dog was bred and raised separately from the short-haired working dogs. With closer European contact from the mid-nineteenth century, the wool breed was lost to interbreeding by 1940.

Contemporary and historical Salish weaving can be viewed at Vancouver’s Museum of Anthropology, and other museums. Don’t forget to look in the storage drawers at MOA, under the Salish displays. For more information and references, see http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2011/11/native-american-blankets-made-wi.html

Dec 072011
 
Chilkat Blanket sold at Bonham’s San Francisco auction Dec. 6

Chilkat Blanket sold at Bonham’s San Francisco auction Dec. 6

Bonham’s last Native American Art auction on June 6 2011 brought in more than $2 million dollars in sales. Its San Francisco auction on December 5 2011 resulted in some interesting prices: a Chilkat blanket sold for $43,750, a Tlingit polychrome basket sold for $2,125.

For other items, see http://www.bonhams.com

Dec 072011
 
Aboriginal Gathering Place. Emily Carr University of Art + Design

Aboriginal Gathering Place. Emily Carr University of Art + Design

The Emily Carr University of Art + Design offers one and two-day workshops at its Aboriginal Gathering Place Studio on Granville Island in Vancouver. Starting in February 2012, there will be instruction in drum and drumstick design and making, cedar bark basketry (Brenda Crabtree), and an introduction to Ravenstail weaving (CherylSamuel).

For more, see http://www.ecuad.ca